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LETTER: Landlords should be more understanding of tenants and pets

Editor: I have been a long-time resident of the Bow Valley, but owning pets has forced me out. Landlords should consider tenants with pets on a case-by-case basis instead of automatically saying no before they have even learned more about the potential

Editor:

I have been a long-time resident of the Bow Valley, but owning pets has forced me out.

Landlords should consider tenants with pets on a case-by-case basis instead of automatically saying no before they have even learned more about the potential tenant and their pets. With the increase of people getting dogs during COVID-19, this would help to alleviate shelters being overrun because people cannot find pet-friendly housing.

Many pet owners would be willing to pay a pet fee or slightly higher rent, which could benefit the landlord. There are many responsible pet owners with well-trained pets who do not cause property damage, make noise or display aggressive behaviour.

Pet owners at least deserve to be considered as tenants and landlords should ask the questions – have they been to a training or behavioural class? How active are they? How old is the pet? What is the person's work schedule? Do they have references? The landlord should also meet the pet.

Discriminating on breed and weight is also illogical because a 20-pound pug can be far more loud, aggressive and destructive than a 70-pound Bernese, for example. It's irresponsible to immediately deny a potential tenant because they have pets.

Landlords, please consider pets on a case-by-case basis, you could find yourself a really great and responsible tenant while ensuring they don't have to re-home their pet, give it to the SPCA or leave the Bow Valley altogether.

Nicole Mathers,

Cochrane