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LETTER: Wondering about the new intersection

Editor: Have you wondered why – as we strive so hard to build new bike paths, wider sidewalks and narrow, crooked roads coming into town to accommodate and impress the visitors flocking in – would it be too much to ask for a little street and alley maintenance in the rest of town for those paying all the bills?

Editor:

Have you wondered why – as we strive so hard to build new bike paths, wider sidewalks and narrow, crooked roads coming into town to accommodate and impress the visitors flocking in – would it be too much to ask for a little street and alley maintenance in the rest of town for those paying all the bills?

What if cyclists actually followed the rules of the road for their own safety and the sanity of drivers? Crosswalks are self explanatory. It is totally unsafe, as well as unfair, to have a cyclist – or runner for that matter – come flying out of nowhere and expect everyone to instantly stop safely, even in a 30 kilometre-an-hour zone.

Most cyclists are pretty good, but many don't even try. Perhaps our bylaw staff could do some education patrols on their e-bikes?

What formula is used that dictates, the higher the density of an area, combined with a large increase in traffic, results in more restrictions on every intersection in that area and likely a skinnier road?

Traffic calming is admirable, but traffic comatose is not so great.

What are the advantages of the new and amazing interchange at our busiest intersection on Benchlands and Bow Valley Trail? Traffic flow seems of little concern. If sensory overload is a goal, that is well accomplished. It is pretty though.

Just to clarify a few things: I like bikes, people, plants, trees, sidewalks and paths. I even like crosswalks, traffic lights, and asphalt and concrete – in any shade or colour – but in moderation and based on necessity and practicality. I still love this town.

Dave Webster,

Canmore