Skip to content

In support of LKD projects

Editor: I was thrilled to read the editorial two weeks ago. I have been intending to write a letter to the editor on this subject for a long time now and you inspired me to get to it. Exshaw has too much lime kiln dust.

Editor:

I was thrilled to read the editorial two weeks ago. I have been intending to write a letter to the editor on this subject for a long time now and you inspired me to get to it.

Exshaw has too much lime kiln dust. Canmore has too many bio solids. This is two problems with one solution. A local, cost effective and environmentally sound solution.

A great deal of investigation has gone into this idea, but I don’t want to bore people with an extremely long letter so I will just hit some important points.

While there are no Canadian regulations about the use of these reclaimed materials, they have been used in the United States.

Down there, they have established guidelines that classify lime stabilized bio solids as either Class A or Class B. Class A is the sort that was created in the tests done here. Class A means that all pathogens have been destroyed and the end product can be used as a reclamation medium.

This means that it could help to reclaim abandoned rock quarries. It has been clearly proven that it can be used to amend local soil and help to re-establish native plant species.

I have read all the information I have been able to find on this project and I have to tell you that I am very impressed by the professional and thorough job that has been done. Careful thought has gone into every detail and the appropriate agencies have been included and involved in the testing.

Were I a citizen of Canmore, I would want to know a lot more about this project and what it might mean cost-wise to my town.

Rose Reid,

Exshaw