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Rocky Mountain Outlook

Rocky Mountain Outlook

In the autumn of 2000, three long-time Bow Valley residents - Larry Marshall, Bob Schott and Carol Picard - began serious planning for a new publication in the Canmore-Banff corridor, one that would cover all communities from Lake Louise to Kananaskis.

Theirs was a novel idea for the day - a free distribution weekly that would put into the hands of residents and the area's millions of tourists the news, entertainment and sports from the communities in which they lived and vacationed, and offer the area's advertisers an effective vehicle to reach those visitors.

Going head-to-head on two fronts with the area's two existing weeklies - the Canmore Leader and The Banff Crag & Canyon - meant few gave the Rocky Mountain Outlook much chance of survival. Not only did they not charge for individual copies, they debuted a mere nine days after Sept. 11, 2001, when the world's tourism market had completely evaporated.

Since those days the Outlook has grown and evolved much like the communities they serve. The challenges and pressures of the mountain parks area of Alberta play out weekly in both the print and online editions of the Rocky Mountain Outlook. A dedication to community journalism has helped maintain our relevance in an engaged community. Currently the Outlook is producing close to half a million print copies annually with close to 99% of those being picked up by our readers at over 200 locations. Visits to rmoutlook.com have more than doubled in the last few years with over 40,000 readers per month now accessing content online. Recognized both provincially and nationally for excellence in community journalism the Rocky Mountain Outlook continues to focus on being the trusted local source of news, sports and entertainment.

Recent Work by Rocky Mountain

Banff Centre hires new visual arts director

Banff Centre hires new visual arts director

“I am confident that my skills and experience will make a positive contribution to Banff Centre as it continues its role as one of the most important and transformative places for artists in the world."

Hug loved ones a little tighter

LETTER: Something smells funny

Editor: So according to our Mayor the foul-smelling odour drifting into Canmore this summer was due to the east winds and climate change. Well then, perhaps it was coming from Ottawa – just a suggestion.

EDITORIAL: Highway stretch too dangerous to ignore

Yoho National Park has a deadly problem that cannot be overlooked by Ottawa any longer.
Canmore Pride focusing on education for second annual celebrations

Canmore Pride focusing on education for second annual celebrations

“This year, we're really focusing on education. What we kind of want to focus on in our vision is establishing visibility, education inclusiveness this year, we're definitely focusing on the education part.”
Donation helps reduce financial barriers for sports participation

Donation helps reduce financial barriers for sports participation

A $40,000 donation will help local children and youth keep active by removing financial barriers to participating in sports and recreation.
Banff playschool receives donation to cover 2022-23 school year rent

Banff playschool receives donation to cover 2022-23 school year rent

A donation of more than $10,000 will help cover the rent for 2022-23 of a Banff playschool.
Smoky skies prompt air quality statements for Banff, Canmore, neighbouring communities

Smoky skies prompt air quality statements for Banff, Canmore, neighbouring communities

Environment Canada issued special air quality statements for local communities Sunday afternoon (Sept. 11).
Town of Banff acknowledges passing of Queen Elizabeth II

Town of Banff acknowledges passing of Queen Elizabeth II

“Banff was first visited by Queen Elizabeth II in 1959, and we hold a special place in our hearts for our official head of state and someone who we know cared for Canada’s first national park," said Mayor Corrie DiManno.
EDITORIAL: Up to everyone to use paths, trails respectfully

EDITORIAL: Up to everyone to use paths, trails respectfully

As the towns of Banff and Canmore have prioritized more active modes of transit, a new battle is taking place among some residents and visitors. Who has priority on the paths and/or trails and is it possible to simply share them and be respectful of one another?